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Right Arrow Trust pledges equal health care for all
28 March 2011 at 15:48
An NHS trust is promising to iron out differences in community health care services for adults across Southport, Formby and West Lancashire once it becomes responsible for them on Friday (1 April 2011).

It will be then that Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust takes responsibility for many of these services currently provided by NHS Sefton and NHS Central Lancashire.

The new model, known as integrated care, removes barriers between hospital and community health care, making it easier, when appropriate, to deliver more care closer to home and in the home.

“To begin with, patients won’t notice much difference,” said Chief Executive Jonathan Parry (pictured). “Services will continue to be provided in the same place, at the same time and by the same staff.

“But, over time, we will see faster access to treatment, investment in community health care as well as an improved experience for patients.

“An example of this would be removing the variations in health care where community services are available to patients in one area but not another, or not the same standard.”

Improvements to services will be overseen by a Clinical Senate, a new, high-level advisory committee set up to report directly to the Trust’s board of directors.

It will be made up of senior clinicians, including hospital consultants and family doctors, health managers and patient representatives.

Mr Parry said: “The Senate will make its recommendations on how we deliver health care services directly to the board, so I expect it to be very influential in how the Trust develops in the years ahead.

He added: “Integrating care between hospital, the community and home will be a more efficient use of scarce NHS resources as well as better meeting the needs of patients.

“These changes will also allow us to focus together on some of the serious health problems that people in our area live with, such as diabetes and heart disease.”


Issued by Tony Ellis, marketing and communications manager
Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust
Telephone 01704 704494
Email tonyellis@nhs.net



Notes for editors


1. What is an Integrated Care Organisation (ICO)?

The Government is encouraging hospitals to integrate with community health services where it is appropriate.

In our case, integrated care means Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust is now responsible for many of the adult health care services previously provided by NHS Sefton and NHS Central Lancashire.


2. Why will the ICO be better for patients?

The ICO will remove barriers between hospital and community health care, making it easier, when it is appropriate, to deliver more care closer to home and in the home.

There will also be more focus on long-term conditions, such as coronary heart disease and diabetes, because of the ICO’s ability to look after the whole of the individual’s needs over a longer period.


3. Will the same community services be provided in north Sefton and West Lancashire?

Currently, there is a variation in services between the two areas because they were previously provided by different organisations.

Some services are similar; some have different names but are the same; some services are provided in one area but not in the other.

Over time it is the Trust’s ambition to deliver community health which is the same high quality wherever you live.


4. Is the Trust changing its name because it now cares for patients outside hospital?

The Trust’s name will stay the same for now. Assuming we become a foundation trust (see question 9), it will change in April 2013. The final name still has to be agreed.


5. Where will the ICO be based?

Services will continue to run from the same places they do now. However, this may change over time as we begin to treat more patients nearer to home and in the home.

The corporate headquarters of the Trust will remain at Southport and Formby District General Hospital.


6. Is the ICO being created to save money?

No. The primary objective is to improve patient care.

The ICO will provide a faster, more seamless health care experience for patients because organisational barriers that hinder communications between clinical teams in hospital and the community will have gone.

The Trust will also be able to focus on some of the serious health problems that people in our area live with, such as diabetes and heart disease.


7. But the Trust still has to save money?

The Trust must save £8½m in 2011-12 which is made up of a combination of Government savings targets and changes to the way in which the NHS is funded.


8. What assurance can you give that community health services won’t be run down to benefit the hospital?

This would not be in the Trust’s interest. We want to develop and invest in community health services so we can treat more people outside hospital and nearer to home.


9. Is the ICO being created so the Trust can become a foundation trust (FT)?

No. The primary objective is to improve patient care.

However, the Government had said all NHS trusts must become FTs by 2014. We intend to apply and be authorised to operate as one by April 2013.

Even after absorbing staff and services from the PCTs we will still remain a small to medium-sized trust with less than 3,000 staff and an operating budget of £170m-£180m.


10. Will there be any job losses as a result of the ICO being created?

There will be no job losses because the Trust has become an ICO.

However, we said in March that we needed to reduce posts across the Trust by up 125 to save £3m off the pay bill to help meet our savings targets.

We hope many of these posts will be lost voluntarily but we are consulting on compulsory redundancies should that become necessary.


11. You say you want to provide care closer to home. Will this mean services are reduced at hospital?

We will be strengthening community-based healthcare because local people
have told us they want high quality, safe services based in their communities.

People should only need to visit a hospital for treatment that can only be carried out safely there. This is good news for the hospital as it will be able to concentrate on what it does best and make available the range of services it offers across a wider variety of settings.

We will always need hospital services, but we want to help people stay well, treat people sooner to catch disease earlier, and treat people in environments that fit with their lifestyles better – which is what people have told us they want.

We will have fewer beds in hospital but this is a national trend supported by what the public have told us – they want to be cared for at home or as near to home as possible.


12. How many fewer beds?

We plan to close a 28-bed medical ward for each of the next three years.

At least one of these wards will be accounted for by discharging patients who are fit to leave sooner. Currently, 30 medically fit patients are occupying beds at any one time when they could be being cared for elsewhere.

We will manage the remaining reduction in beds by treating patients in more appropriate settings such as in the outpatients department, in the community or at home.


13. How will the ICO affect care I receive or services I use now?

While we expect the ICO to deliver some benefits to patients quickly, we anticipate that the main improvements for patient care and services will come as the organisation develops.

For example, there will be more focus on supporting people to stay well, and supporting those with a long-term health condition, such as coronary heart disease and diabetes, because of the ICO’s ability to look after the whole of the individual’s needs over a longer period.


14. How will the Trust ensure the services it provides meet the needs of local people?

We will work closely with other health professionals, in particular family doctors who are expected to become responsible for commissioning health services.

The Trust is also establishing a Clinical Senate as a committee of the Trust Board on which senior clinicians from the Trust and the community will be strongly represented. Patient representatives will also have a voice here too.

The Senate’s is expected to be very influential in how the Trust develops its services in the years ahead.


15. What health care services will be provided by the ICO?

The hospital trust will continue to provide the same services it has always done.

Adult community health care services transferred in north Sefton to the ICO:

• Adult dietetics
• Blue badge
• Clinical health psychology
• Combined adult therapy service
• Community adult diabetes
• Community matrons
• Community phlebotomy
• Community treatment Rooms
• Discharge planning
• District nursing
• District nursing out of hours
• Falls
• Intermediate care in community
• ISIS (sexual health)
• Leg ulcer
• Lifestyles - continence and urology
• Lifestyles - stoma
• Lymphoedema
• Pain service
• Palliative care
• Podiatry services
• Tissue viability
• Wheelchair services

Adult community health care services transferred in West Lancashire to the ICO:

• Chlamydia and contraceptive sexual health service
• Community adult physiotherapy and domiciliary
• Physiotherapy
• Paediatric medical staff
• Community audiology (community children's services)
• Community dietetics (inc enteral feeding)
• Community matrons
• Community neuro team, occupational therapy and speech therapy
• Continence
• Diabetes
• Diabetic DESMOND
• Discharge planning
• District nursing inc treatment rooms
• Domiciliary medicines management / CHESS
• Falls
• Food for Life
• Intermediate care services
• Marie Curie
• Phlebotomy
• Podiatry
• Stoma
• Stop smoking services
• Walk-in centre
• Wheelchair services